Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone


Home » Entries posted by Andrei Soldatov
Stories written by Andrei Soldatov

Voices from the frontlines of censorship: Andrei Soldatov

Voices from the frontlines of censorship: Andrei Soldatov

The beauty of the Russian approach to internet censorship is that it doesn’t need to be technically sophisticated to be efficient -- it's all about instigating self-censorship, writes Andrei Soldatov

What did Russia block this autumn?

What did Russia block this autumn?

Andrei Soldatov looks at the websites authorities have been censoring over the past months

Russia: We know what you blocked this summer

Russia: We know what you blocked this summer

The major news in internet censorship in summer 2013 in Russia is a new law on copyright covering film, television and video productions. Andrei Soldatov reports

What Russia blocked in May

What Russia blocked in May

The Russian authorities came out with two new categories of website to be banned in May: on manufacturing explosive devices and bribery. If the first is the reaction of the authorities to the Boston bombings, the latter reflects major social problems of the society in Russia. Andrei Soldatov

What’s Russia blocking on the web?

What’s Russia blocking on the web?

April saw a bizarre variety of sites blocked by the Russian authorities or internet service providers – among them Pussy Riot videos, Wikipedia, the Yandex search engine, and sites promoting bribery and corruption. Compiled by Andrei Soldatov

What Russia censored in March

In March the Russian authorities turned their attentions to online social networks — and the Kremlin proved adept at getting major international companies to comply with its directives: on 15 March Twitter blocked an account that promoted drugs and on 29 March Facebook took down a page called “Suicide School”

What Russia censored in February

It became clear in February that internet censorship in Russia could be expanded to include sites with gay content. The State Duma voted for a bill banning “propaganda” for homosexuality involving minors, the second reading of which is scheduled for 25 May. Many commentators believe that by then the bill

What Russia censored in January

January saw a dramatic escalation of internet filtering in Russia. The League for Internet Safety, an organisation backed by the Kremlin, launched an experiment in the Kostroma region in central Russia in which 29 local internet service providers signed new contracts with users, giving them access only to a sanitised internet

The Kremlin makes its move on Facebook

The Kremlin makes its move on Facebook

Russian parliamentarians have passed legislation that will establish a central register of banned websites. The new laws are ostensibly designed for child protection, but Andrei Soldatov says the real aim is to take control over the country’s burgeoning social networks READ: INDEX ON CENSORSHIP CONDEMNS RUSSIAN INTERNET BLACKLIST PLAN